Why America Is Better Than France

There are hundreds of reasons, obviously (Jerry Lewis vs. Lewis Black, for example), but the story of the French reaction to the DSX sex assault case is yet another reminder of how far European culture has fallen, and how wrong America’s critics—like Barack Obama—are to urge us to follow the French model.

This article from a Time magazine reporter in Paris simply stunning:

A regional Socialist Party official stepped up on Monday to say that her daughter had come under sexual attack during a 2002 interview with Strauss-Kahn. The official, Anne Mansouret, repeated the allegations made by her daughter Tristane Banon during a 2007 TV program about how a well-known politician [Strauss-Kahn's name was bleeped out] tried to overpower her with a sexual embrace. What took so long for Mansouret to back up her daughter and name Strauss-Kahn? She told French TV that she had dissuaded her daughter from filing charges because Strauss-Kahn was en route to greatness — and derailing the ascent of a fellow Socialist Party official would be bad form.

A sexual assault on your DAUGHTER. And you talk her out of filing charges to protect your political party? That’s not “continental,” that creepy, disgusting and wrong. But so very, very French.

The case in New York City reflects another dimension of the problem in France. "If I try transposing the situation in New York on Sunday to France, I just can’t do it," says [a French activist]. "Not only because the woman is black and apparently an immigrant. But also because she’s a housekeeper. Perhaps even more than her race, her station in society would probably prevent authorities [in France] from taking her accusations against a rich and powerful man seriously. Racism is on the rise here again, but class discrimination has never gone away."

In America, we can’t imagine covering up such a crime. In France, they can’t imagine even prosecuting it.  Like I said, we’re better than them.

Peggy Noonan writes about our cultural superiority in the WSJ today, too:

As David Rieff wrote in The New Republic, to French intellectuals, DSK deserves special treatment because he is a valuable person. "The French elites’ consensus seems to be that it is somehow Strauss-Kahn himself and not the 32-year-old maid who is the true victim of this drama."

Americans totally went for the little guy. The French went for the power.

Lafayette would weep.

Someone once sniffed, "In America they call waiters ‘Sir.’ " Bien sur, my little bonbon. It’s part of our unlost greatness.

I know we have some lefties in the US who would put their politics above all else (remember the “journalist” from Newsweek who offered to (ahem) “service” Bill Clinton in thanks for his pro-abortion policies?). But they are few and far between.

America is a nation that challenges the powerful and defends the weak. In France, they defend the powerful and demean the weak.  Particularly if the “powerful” in question is a good Socialist.

Because they REALLY care about the power. You know—when they’re not raping them…

Michael Graham
Radio talk show host, columnist for the Boston Herald, stand-up comic and former GOP political consultant. Learn more about Michael here.

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