Inauguration 2013: “But Michael, This Time He MEANS It…”

A reminder from my friends at Reason Magazine about what happened the last time President Obama gave an inaugural speech:

 

 

Perhaps that’s why so many Americans feel differently today than four years ago:

Just before Obama’s first Inauguration, 68 percent of Americans were thrilled or happy about it — and now 50 percent feel that way about the second swearing in, according to a CNN/ORC International poll…

In fact, the 50 percent who are thrilled or happy today matches the percentage of Americans excited just before George W. Bush’s second Inauguration, the poll found.

Meanwhile, the survey also showed that more Americans view today as a celebration for Obama’s supporters than they view it as a celebration of democracy in action.

Sixty-two percent say it’s for Obama’s supporters and 35 percent say it’s a celebration of democracy. That’s a near reversal from four years ago, when about 60 percent thought it was a celebration of democracy and 39 percent thought it was just for his supporters

When you choose to attack rather than lead, when you choose to run an entirely negative campaign, when you choose to accuse people who disagree with you of not caring if old people die and children starve, it tends to hurt your popularity beyond your base.

Which might explain why Obama’s first-term approval ratings are lower than ever recent president except Ford and (at the very bottom) Carter.

And explains why so many of the American people have already tuned out, even before the first words of his speech are spoken.

 

 

 

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Michael Graham
Radio talk show host, columnist for the Boston Herald, stand-up comic and former GOP political consultant. Learn more about Michael here.

Natural Truth of the Day

For several months now, whenever the topic of enrollment in the Affordable Care Act came up, I've been saying that it was too soon to tell its ultimate effects. We don't know how many people have paid for their new insurance policies, or how many of those who bought policies were previously uninsured. For that, I said, we will have to wait for Census Bureau data, which offer the best assessment of the insurance status of the whole population... I stand corrected: These data won't be available at all. Ever.-- Megan McArdle, Bloomberg View.